UPDATE: After posting this story originally, Governor Whitmer announced that the COVID-19 epidemic orders on gatherings and masks will be lifted starting on June 22nd. Indoor and outdoor setting will increase to 100% capacity and the state will no longer require residents to wear a face mask.

Restrictions set to end on July 1st could be lifted soon than anticipated.

Governor Gretchen Whitmer was in Grand Rapids on Wednesday and hinted that COVID-19 restrictions could be lifted sooner than expected. Hopefully, we will see an announcement today or Friday with good news of that nature.

Thanks to this rollout and to all the Michiganders who’ve gotten their shot, we’re looking forward at the next rollback in the coming days...It’s scheduled for July 1, but I think you should stay tuned...said Governor Whitmer at an appearance in Grand Rapids. 

Under the current order from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, most indoor public spaces are working at 50% capacity. Also, there is still an indoor mask mandate for those who are unvaccinated. This order is set to expire on July 1st.

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Michigan is one of the last few states to still have restrictions along with New Mexico, Oregon, Washington, and Hawaii. There are 13 states in the nation that still require unvaccinated people to wear masks inside public places.

At this point, I'm sure we are all ready for this to be over. We are all just counting down the days to when restaurants and venues can be at 100% capacity. As for masks, I'm sure many people will still choose to wear them and that is totally fine. Personally, I could go the rest of my life without seeing another mask again and be perfectly okay with that. After a year of watching friends fight over a small piece of fabric, I'll be happy when we can all put it behind us.

Source: MLive

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