Have you ever seen purple paint marked on a fence or tree anywhere in Michigan?

Well, apparently, it is not an arts and crafts project.

There is a reason for all of the purple paint markings that you see.

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What is the Purple Paint Law?

Zareba Systems says,

Purple paint on trees, fences, or other objects means 'keep ou' or 'No trespassing' in many states.

It's a law that says, in the most basic terms, STAY AWAY! KEEP OFF! NO TRESPASSING!

It is the easiest way for a homeowner to let anyone know to stay away from their private property.

Why Purple?

That's a great question.

Purple has been considered a color associated with danger around the world.

The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) has reserved purple for use as a warning color but has yet to actually use it. ANSI did not that purple now has almost worldwide recognition as being associated with radiation hazards.

Also, Zareba Systems says that,

Purple marks are more permanent and can be more recognizable from a distance. Plus, purple paint laws are common enough now that manufactures are adapting. Some companies have even made fluorescent paints for marking things like gas lines.

 

Purple Paint Law Rules

The purple paint markings need to be eight inches long and one inch wide. The markings also must be three to five feet above the ground.

They should also be on multiple trees or objects no more than 100 feet apart from each other.

Was this law passed in Michigan?

It has not officially passed, however, I have seen my fair share of purple markings on various trees and fences within the state of Michigan.

The states who have officially passed this law are:

  • Alabama
  • Arkansas
  • Arizona
  • Florida
  • Illinois
  • Indiana
  • Kansas
  • Maine
  • Missouri
  • North Carolina
  • Pennsylvania
  • South Carolina
  • Tennessee, and
  • Texas

Instead of using purple, Idaho and Montana use orange paint to signify no trespassing.

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Before you decide to grow a few plants this spring, make sure they are not one of these twelve plants that are prohibited by the state of Michigan.

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