On this day in 1977, Bob Seger's "Night Moves" single peaked at #4 on the charts. While the "Night Moves" album topped out at #8 on the album chart and at last count has sold over six million copies.
In going over some of the write ups about the Night Moves album when it came out these two caught my eye.
Steve Weitzman from Circus magazine May 1977 issue had this to say...
“The word is that rock singer Bob Seger has arrived. Arrived? For chrissakes, the man has been playing professionally for half his life already since his first gigs as a sixteen year old in 1960. If anything, he’s been a local legend in his hometown of Detroit and most of the Midwest for almost a decade, amazingly having three of the four biggest selling albums in the history of the Detroit market, ‘Live Bullet’ is the biggest selling album of all time there, ‘Night Moves, Seger’s new album has shot to number two and ‘Beautiful Loser’, his 1974 album, is number four. What’s number three? ‘Abbey Road’. Bob Seger hasn’t arrived. The rest of the country is just waking up.”
Bill Gray in the March 11, 1977 edition of The Detroit News wrote...
“Seger, reached in Buffalo Wednesday, talked about how his recent success hasn’t changed things much. “It’s kinda nice,” said the gravel voice over the phone. “I actually got mobbed last night by some people after the show. First time that’s happened outside of Detroit.” He continues underplaying his success: “There’s only so much you can put in a suitcase,” he says, “It’s unusual not having to worry about next year’s bills…there’s a little more adulation now and a lot more press.” Does he now plan to move from Detroit to a more glamorous climate? “No way. It’s home.” Adds Punch Andrews, Seger’s personal manager, friend and confidante, “It’s taken me 12 years to put carpeting in the office here,” he laughs. And there is another change. Seger and his band no longer drive to their one-night stands in beat-up campers that carried them in the lean days on the long and winding road. “But they fly coach, not first-class,” Punch says. “Maybe it’s a throwback to harder times but I can’t see where getting there four feet sooner makes all that much difference.” (Note: With Punch’s watchful eye on the books, that carpeting is still there today!)

 

 

Source: bobseger.com